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I'm amazed at how superior your vanilla is!
- Des, The Grommet

SHOPPERS, PLEASE NOTE:

We will be closed Friday, December 21st through Sunday, January 6th. Orders placed during this time will be shipped upon our return.
Orders must be placed by Noon on December 20th in order to ship before our holiday closure.

Awareness

Where are the tropics? Why do they matter? How can we help? We love the foods, we care about the ecology, and we’re curious about the lives of the growers and their families. It’s all about awareness. The articles collected here address some of the struggles, challenges, opportunities and hope that affect tropical communities, their environment, the commodities they produce and their economies.Learning about the complexities and politics of the foods that sustain us and tantalize our palates, gives us a greater understanding about the issues faced by people in the tropics. The plight of a woman refugee and her children in the Congo basin, the struggle of farmers in Papua New Guinea, the success of a collective in Guatemala: Each story underscores our planetary interconnectedness and the need for us to be mindful of the choices we make and a commitment we must make to support the tropical environment and communities for the well-being of us all.

Explore this section:
Eco Tips | Environmental Issues | Issues of Concern | Protecting the Future | Socially-Conscious Issues | About the Tropics | Yes, We Can Create Change

Will the 2018 Crop Bring Lower Vanilla Prices?

 

1-Bahrat 4 vines on jatropha

 

In December of 2017, a market report was released by a European company that has been in the vanilla business for more than 100 years and is known for their honest and reliable industry assessments. The report addressed the complicated conditions on the ground in Madagascar as well as an update on other major vanilla bean producers such as Papua New Guinea, Indonesia, East Africa, Mexico, Polynesia and India. Countries such as Papua New Guinea and Indonesia have increased production considerably and will hopefully continue to do so and to create better quality vanilla beans overall.

Bread, Wine, Chocolate: The Slow Loss of Foods We Love — A Review

sethi_breadwinechocolate_3d

In late March I received an e-mail from Simran Sethi requesting an interview regarding the cyclone that struck Madagascar two weeks earlier and how it would impact the already troubled vanilla market. I responded that I would be happy to talk and a date and time were set. What happened next was serendipity. Within a few minutes of our meeting, Simran and I realized we have been traveling the same path with the same concerns and seeking the same outcomes on behalf of those who grow the foods we all love that are becoming endangered in ways that most of the world is unaware.

The Important Truth About Saffron

saffron-threads-can_Fotor

What is bad about saffron?
Intrinsically nothing. However, as saffron has reigned as queen of the expensive flavors and spices since Medieval times, unscrupulous dealers throughout the centuries have used safflower and other imposters as the real deal. Unfortunately, despite laws to keep our food safe, sleight-of-hand is even happening right here in the US. 

Here’s what’s going on:
All saffron sold commercially is now grown in Iran and Afghanistan. Whoa! What about Spain? Times have changed in sleepy La Mancha, where no one tilts with windmills and the region no longer closes down in October for the crocus harvest. Families no longer sit around long tables tweezers-in-hand, plucking the three stigmas from each flower and dropping the purple petals in baskets. Trays of saffron threads no longer rest about the family stove, drying just enough to be packaged then shipped to those who value this coveted flavor in their foods.

Sadly, those days are gone, but Spain still plays a pivotal role in the dispersal of saffron. Spain is where saffron is doctored and passed off as a pure, natural flavor.

For many years saffron has been an important Persian export, perhaps not as valuable as petroleum, but for the culinary world, a necessary delicacy. Sanctions and a changing climate have been very difficult for saffron for quite some time and prices have continued to edge upwards. However, sanctions have been lifted and Iran is again offering premium quality saffron.

Saffron prices have skyrocketed, selling for $1600 a pound or more. Of course, most of us buy a few grams or half an ounce at a time, enough for several meals. At about $4.00 a gram, saffron is actually an affordable  luxury.

Because Spain has been known for centuries as the only place to buy saffron, it is shipped from Iran to Spain for repackaging, then exported as Spanish saffron.

While this is not true of all saffron emerging from Spain, a significant portion is processed to remove the volatile oils and colorants, then sold to Japan as a coveted dye. The threads are left with little flavor and their color is largely gone. Red dyes banned in much of Europe and in the United States are applied to the threads, then dried, packaged in decorative Spanish tins, and sent to big box stores, supermarkets and other destinations, including specialty stores, where they are sold. There is no way to check the saffron in the tins until after it is purchased. The price may be significantly lower, but what you’re purchasing is not what you had in mind.

US customs is aware of what is going on, but allows it through unchallenged. As it can cost up to $40,000 for a full lab report, it’s easier to look the other way rather than inspect each shipment that arrives in our ports.

If you have bought saffron recently, check it carefully. Smell the threads. The odor should be clean and pungent. Tainted saffron that I smelled had only a faint saffron aroma. The threads themselves were dull and mottled, not vibrant with a red and yellow hue.

If you love saffron, don’t take the risk of being duped. Purchase quality saffron, then store it in a cool, dark cupboard, where it will last for years.

We are now selling very

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  • Why is vanilla so expensive?

    Have you noticed that the cost of cookies, cakes and ice creams have been creeping up? Most desserts use vanilla, and vanilla prices have skyrocketed since 2014. Could that be it? Absolutely! And why is vanilla so expensive now? The answer may surprise you. Read on.

    As vanilla prices rise, so do baked goods. Picture credit: http://experimentalgastronomy.wordpress.com

    As vanilla prices rise, so do baked goods.  Or do they? Picture credit: The Experimental Gastronomy

    Like everything else, the cost of vanilla is affected by supply and demand, and today the vanilla supply is down – WAY DOWN. The reasons will surprise you!

    Tropical farmers who grow coffee, cacao, vanilla, sugar and a few other crops, constantly face fluctuating prices for their crops due to supply and demand. And because vanilla is by far the smallest of the tropical luxury crops, the vanilla industry faces dramatic fluctuations.

    CASEM COOP: A Story of Commitment, Endurance and Love

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    It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent that survives. It is the one that is most adaptable to changeAttributed to Charles Darwin

    If you’ve traveled to Costa Rica, you’ve experienced its beauty and the many ways to enjoy all it offers. A small, narrow country angled between Nicaragua and Panama, it is bordered on the east by the Atlantic Ocean; on the west, the Pacific. It has a high literacy rate, no military, is politically stable and welcomes tourists to enjoy its warm, tropical weather, outdoor activities and eco-tourism.

    Ecotourism in Costa Rica’s Monteverde Reserve

    178-IMG_4093Monteverde Cloud Forest Biological Reserve During the Dry Season

    In my humble opinion, ecotourism is so much more fun and enlightening than staying at a resort full of amenities but short on soul. My visit to Costa Rica in March was full of soul, but even more, filled with many terrific experiences that I’ll savor for years to come.

    Costa Rica has positioned itself as a world leader in responsible ecotourism. This is a wise move for a developing country with so many natural resources, a diversified, literate population, a relatively low crime rate (and no army!) and a stable economy. The Ticos, as they refer to themselves, say they were lucky that their country didn’t have resources like abundant gold, silver or oil, so their country was largely ignored instead of plundered like so many of the countries in the Americas.

    Villa Vanilla: A Farm In Harmony With Nature

    088-IMG_4003As a serious food enthusiast, along with my dedication to equitable opportunities for farmers, one of my favorite activities is visiting farms. No matter if they flourish in a temperate or tropical climate, I always learn from the farmers as well as from the plants, birds, insects and animals who call the farms their home. I indulged this passion during my recent trip to Costa Rica where I toured farms in the mountainous San Carlos district, a rain forest region in Alajuela province, famous for fine Arabica coffee, sugar cane, pineapples and cattle production. Vanilla is now grown on a few farms in this district, usually in tandem with other crops, including commercial production of trees for use in home building. From there I continued down to a vanilla and spice farm in the lowland Central Pacific coastal region in Quepos district, Puntarenas province.

    Off to Costa Rica In Support of Vanilla Farmers

     

    1-LaFaza HITA Zibu cart w libraryIn 2013 I was contacted by the National University of Costa Rica to speak at a round-table conference on vanilla in 2016. I was both honored and excited by the prospects of returning to Costa Rica after 52 years (which sounds impossible, but it’s true).

    Why do our customers love Rain's Choice vanilla?

    • You get MORE FLAVOR because we use 20% more beans in our extracts than is required by law!
    • 99% of all vanilla products are imitation. Ours are 100% PURE!
    • We carefully choose all products to assure best QUALITY & FLAVOR!
    • Our farmers are paid a FAIR PRICE.
    • Our vanilla beans are SUSTAINABLY grown.
    • Everything we sell is ORGANICALLY grown.
    • Your purchase here supports our HUMANITARIAN efforts.

    Thank you for supporting The Vanilla Company and our farmers! BUY HERE now.

    For an update on the 2016 vanilla shortage, please see "Why is Vanilla so Expensive?"

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